Glyphosate weed killer found in ice cream

Is this cancer-linked poison hiding in your favorite summer treat?

Ice cream might seem like the perfect cool treat on a warm summer’s day.

Sure, you know it’s not exactly HEALTHY.

But what’s summer without a little ice cream? So of course, you’ll have some… and you might think you’re safe if you go with a flavor from a brand like Ben & Jerry’s.

While its products aren’t organic, the company has built a reputation on using basic and natural ingredients, including milk that’s free of recombinant bovine growth hormone.

More importantly, the company insists there are no GMOs in its famous pints, and it even supports sensible labeling laws.

You’d LIKE to think that — but you’d be wrong!

Tests on 11 samples of Ben & Jerry’s ice cream by the Organic Consumers Association found that all but one had traces of glyphosate, a chemical weed killer used on genetically modified foods that has been linked to cancer.

There’s so much research on this chemical that the World Health Organization’s cancer agency has listed it as a “probable carcinogen.”

Ben & Jerry’s says it doesn’t know how this dangerous chemical ended up in its ice cream.

But the proof is in the pudding — or, in this case, the Chocolate Fudge Brownie, which was one of the flavors to test positive for the killer chemical.

This doesn’t mean the company’s lying. It just proves that this chemical is so common and so widely used that it’s now working its way into EVERY LEVEL of the food chain.

It’s not just ice cream, either.

Studies show that some 80 percent of the U.S. food supply now has some detectable level of glyphosate, and 93 percent of Americans have traces of the chemical in their urine.

The food industry will tell you that in most cases those levels fall far below the “safe” limits set by the Environmental Protection Agency, as is the case with the Ben & Jerry’s samples.

But don’t take too much comfort in that. The EPA “safe” limits are industry-friendly numbers that allow for far more of the chemical in food than should be there.

One study earlier this year, for example, found that levels well below the EPA limit — including the amount found in one of those ice cream samples — caused fatty liver disease in rats.

So, how can you avoid it?

It’s possible that you can’t anymore. Not completely.

But you can minimize your exposure and cut the risks by eating only organics.

By law, they can’t be grown with chemicals such as weed killers and pesticides… and by law, they can’t be genetically modified.

While studies have shown that even organics may actually contain the chemical, it’s generally at far lower levels caused by cross-contamination rather than the higher levels you’ll find in foods where the chemical was directly used.