The drug-free secret to emergency pain relief

When you're in pain in the emergency room, you need relief... and you need it fast.

That means the most powerful meds in the building, right?

WRONG!

A groundbreaking new study reveals how you can get QUICK and EFFECTIVE relief even in the dire circumstances of the emergency room... without ANY drugs at all.

The secret is acupuncture, the treatment already proven to help bring major relief from chronic pain over the long term.

But the new study finds it even works for immediate emergency-level pain.

This one focused on patients with back pain, ankle injuries, and migraines, but not the run-of-the-mill stuff you might "tough out" at home. These were people in so much agony they went to the emergency room, where they reported pain levels of at least a 4 on a 10-point scale.

Some were given painkillers. Some were given acupuncture. And some were given both.

An hour later, all three groups had similar results.

None of the treatments were CURES for the pain. While pain levels dropped across the board, less than 40 percent saw those levels dip by two points or more.

But it was enough to help them through the immediate crisis: Two days later, the vast majority said they were satisfied with their treatment.

In fact, 83 percent of those who got ONLY acupuncture said they'd be perfectly happy getting the same treatment again, compared to 78 percent given the drugs and 81 percent who got both.

Sounds to me like ERs should start adding acupuncturists to the staff... because this isn't the only study to find the technique works in emergency situations.

Just last year, a major study put acupuncture up against one of the most powerful painkillers used in ERs: morphine.

You'd think that would be a cakewalk for the morphine, right?

NOPE!

In that study, acupuncture delivered relief to more patients and did it faster... almost twice as fast in many cases. And while morphine made patients loopy and dizzy, as you'd expect, the folks given acupuncture had ZERO major side effects.

What makes these studies so compelling is not just what it means in the ER.

It's what happens later.

When folks are put on painkillers in the emergency room, they're usually sent home with a supply of those same meds -- or at least similar ones -- and maybe even a prescription for more.

That leads to the risk of both immediate side effects and long-term problems, including addiction.

Instead of meds, however, patients could end up getting referrals for more acupuncture, cutting off that cycle before it ever has a chance to start.