aging

  1. Having a purpose in life can fight the effects of dementia

    How a purpose can fight dementia

    What's your purpose in life?

    No, I'm not writing about philosophy this week. This is a health issue -- because having something to keep you going can, well, keep you going in more ways than one.

    In fact, a new study finds that having a purpose can slow the onset of dementia by nearly a third -- limiting the actual outward signs of the disease even as your brain starts to deteriorate on the inside.

    In this remarkable study, researchers asked 246 seniors to take a 10-question psychological test to determine whether they had a purpose in life. According to HealthDay News, the researchers defined "purpose" as a "tendency to find meaning from life experience, to be intentional and focused."

    More specifically, they said seniors with a purpose felt that life was good and they were contributing to their lives by making their own decisions.

    Then, after the seniors died, the researchers took a look at their brains -- and found, as you might expect among any group of seniors, that many had the damage linked to dementia. Specifically, the "plaques and tangles" that have become a reliable marker of the disease.

    Well, they're a reliable marker most of the time -- because the seniors who had a purpose showed fewer signs of cognitive decline even when they had plenty of those plaques and tangles.

    Overall, the researchers say their rate of cognitive decline was 30 percent slower in seniors with a purpose -- even after adjusting for other factors, such as illness or depression.

    Of course, having a purpose is one thing. But I know many of you want something a little more tangible for avoiding dementia.

    This summer, I'll have all the details on the one supplement you should take if you want to avoid dementia in my printed newsletter, Health Revelations. Sign up here, and you'll be one of the first to get it.

  2. Early menopause, early death

    No woman likes reaching menopause -- and not just because of the physical problems that come along with it.

    It's a reminder that you're aging... and who wants to be reminded of that?

    So naturally, menopause isn't exactly welcome news at any age. But when women reach "the change" early, they face even more problems -- and not just the emotional toll of a premature aging milestone.

    I saw a 48-year-old patient recently who went into menopause early, at 42. Sure enough, she had all sorts of health problems -- including fatigue, poor memory, and even the beginnings of bone loss.

    I explained to her that a doctor should have had her on natural hormones years ago. Needless to say, we got to work on replenishing her body's vital hormones.

    It's not just her.

    A new study of 390 Swedish women confirms the risks of early menopause, including double the risk of osteoporosis, a 70 percent increase in the risk of bone breaks, and a 60 percent higher risk of an early death when compared to women who reached the change after they turned 47.

    Early menopause can be triggered by any number of factors. Some, like genetics, aren't entirely within your control. But others are -- and if you're a smoker, quit now. The habit can boost your risk of early menopause by up to 60 percent.

    Exposure to toxic chemicals can also up your odds, and you don't have to work with hazardous waste to have high levels of dangerous toxins.

    Some of them are in your home right now.

    One study last year found that high levels of the perfluorocarbons used in many household products can increase the risk of early menopause by up to 40 percent. These PFCs are often used to make products waterproof, wrinkle-free, stain resistant, and non-stick.

    In other words, they're all around you. That's why I write to you so often about how to avoid these chemicals and how to detoxify when you have been exposed.

    Whatever the cause of your change -- whether it's early or right on time -- and you need more than just nutritional support, you can get over the worst of it with the help of hormones.

    And by that, I don't mean the drug industry's dangerous artificial hormones.

    Turn to bioidentical hormones instead. Bioidentical hormones are custom-made to match your body's needs -- and are exactly the same as what your body produces.

    I have an in-depth article on testing and treating menopausal women with bioidentical hormones in an upcoming issue of my Health Revelations newsletter. Sign up here, and you'll be among the first to get it.

    For more help in identifying and treating hormone imbalances, visit a holistic doctor or schedule a visit with me at my clinic.

  3. How to beat osteoporosis

    The most important thing you need to know about osteoporosis is that this bone disease is not inevitable.
  4. Healthy aging begins with a sip

    If anyone knows a thing or two about healthy aging, it's the Japanese. They live longer and better than anyone else on the planet, nearly five years longer than Americans on average. So what's the secret?
  5. Cognitive decline begins in middle age

    Senior moments aren't just for seniors anymore. Anyone can have a brain hiccup no matter how old or young they are -- but the latest research shows that the cognitive slide we usually associate with aging actually begins earlier than anyone would have thought.
  6. Aging signs -- or warning signs?

    Millions of seniors battle the three S's in their later years: the stoop, the shakes, and the shuffle. And most docs will respond with their own S: the shrug as they tell you it's just part of getting older. Bull.
  7. Sex can help women age better

    Sex doesn't just get better with age -- age gets better with sex, especially for women.
  8. Stay young by fighting pain

    The quickest route to old age is along the express lanes of chronic pain.
  9. Staying connected, staying healthy

    Having a strong social support circle is a key factor in overall health when it comes to aging.
  10. Turn back the clock without plastic surgery

    It's amazing what some people will put themselves through in order to look young.

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