exercise

  1. Unlock the benefits of exercise in just 3 minutes

    A three-minute workout that really works

    Think “exercise” means spending painful hours in the gym?

    Think again!

    Think "exercise" means spending painful hours in the gym?

    Think again!

    The latest research shows you can get major improvements in your fitness and slash your heart risk at the same time.

    And you can do it in just THREE MINUTES!

    You don't need a gym. You don't need "workout clothes." You don't even need a single piece of equipment.

    All you need is a staircase, because the new study finds that one of the best "workouts" you can get is climbing up and down those stairs for very short periods of time.

    The workouts in the study were so simple anyone could do them: Climb up and down the stairs for 60 seconds. Rest for about a minute. Then do it again. Rest another minute, then hit the stairs one more time.

    That's it, you're done.

    Really.

    You don't have to do it every day. In the new study, the women who took part repeated the workouts just three times a week.

    With a short warm-up and cool-down, each session lasted only 10 minutes -- but just three of those minutes were spent doing the actual "exercise."

    You'd think there wouldn't be much benefit to that.

    After all, how much of a workout can your body get in nine minutes per week?

    Turns out, quite a bit -- because after six weeks, these women had major improvements in their overall cardiorespiratory fitness.

    That's a key measure of cardiovascular health.

    The better it gets, the better your heart health. And the better your heart health, the lower your risk of heart disease, heart attack and heart failure.

    And you can enjoy that in just THREE MINUTES of climbing stairs!

    There is a catch here. There's always a catch, right?

    You can't just leisurely stroll up or down the steps like you might in the department store.

    You need to put a little effort into it, like you're in a department store on sale day.

    Don't go crazy and risk hurting yourself. The last thing I want is for you to fall on that staircase.

    But push yourself a little. It might be tough, but you're only doing it for a minute at a time.

    If that's all you do, you're already doing more exercise than the average American -- and, as the new study shows, you'll enjoy big benefits, too.

    But why stop there?

    To maximize your health, spend a little time active and on your feet every day -- because daily movement is the best way to protect your heart, slash your risk of stroke, prevent cancer and even cut your dementia risk.

    And you can do it one step at a time.

  2. Exercise briefly for life-extending benefits

    Save your life in just 15 minutes a day

    There's not a heck of a lot you can do in 15 minutes.

    Last time I called my cable company, I was on hold for 20 minutes before I even got to speak with someone!

    But believe it or not, the most important thing you can do for yourself right now takes just 15 minutes.

    In fact, that short stretch of time can help you live a long life -- because new research shows how just 15 minutes of movement per day can cut the risk of an early death in seniors.

    Yes, a little more movement could add up to many more years of healthy living!

    The massive new study tracked more than 120,000 folks over the age of 60 for a full decade... and over that time, the folks who got this little bit of daily movement were 22 percent less likely to die.

    Folks who got even more exercise had an even bigger benefit -- but not by much.

    In fact, the BIGGEST drop in death risk is the one you'll get with those 15 minutes of movement.

    That's just 105 minutes per week -- and FAR less than the 150 minutes recommended by guidelines.

    It's so little that just about anyone can do it with little effort... yet so few people do.

    Most folks won't try 15 seconds, much less 15 minutes, because they think any exercise at all is pure torture.

    But the study proves just what you've read right here in House Calls over the years: You don't have to risk pain and injury... you don't have to suffer... and you don't have to break a sweat to get what you need each day.

    All it takes is a little light to moderate movement. In fact, the new study finds that even a 15-minute brisk walk counts!

    I don't care how old you are. I don't care if you have heart disease or diabetes. I don't care if you get winded just getting off the sofa.

    You CAN get 15 minutes of movement... and you SHOULD, too, because the benefits aren't limited to helping you live longer (as if that's not enough).

    You can also live better, as daily movement can help with everything from building strength and stamina to helping you breathe easier. A little exercise can even help cut your risk of some of the diseases that seniors fear most.

    I'll have the full scoop on how exercise can protect against cancer coming up in next month's edition of my subscription newsletter, Health Revelations.

    And that's not all I'll have.

    Each month, I deliver the latest in cutting-edge natural cures, and you can make sure you never miss a single one of these breakthroughs by signing up today.

    Learn more right here.

  3. Exercise can ease sleep apnea

    Exercise comes with a long list of benefits, and here’s one more: It can help ease sleep apnea, even if you don’t lose weight.
  4. Exercise can stop your brain from shrinking

    Exercise is as good for the brain as it is for the body, and if you can get active today you may be able to prevent one of the warning signs of dementia tomorrow.
  5. Extra exercise won’t lead to extra weight loss

    Exercise is great for burning calories, but only to a point. New research finds that moderate exercise is best for weight loss.
  6. The diet and exercise plan to living longer

    Diet and exercise can help you live healthier and longer while cutting your risk of death from heart problems by nearly half.
  7. Types of exercise that prevent stroke

    Women who exercise have a 20 percent lower risk of stroke, according to new research.
  8. Physical activity can ease MS

    Short exercise sessions can help ease pain, fight fatigue and improve quality of life in MS patients, according to a new study.
  9. Healthy Aging

    If you want to live longer and avoid major disease, stick to these five basic "clean living" habits.
  10. Healthy aging with basic movements

    A little exercise can increase your odds of healthy aging -- even if you've spent years being inactive.
  11. Everyday exercise tips can save your life

    Chores and other activities can protect your heart and even ward off death.
  12. Ways to lose weight

    Exercise alone isn't enough to help you to lose weight -- and if that's all you do, you might even gain a few pounds.
  13. Exercise beats drugs for heart & stroke patients

    Exercise is as good as or even better than drugs for patients fighting stroke, heart attack and heart disease, according to new research.
  14. Losing body weight helps relieve osteoarthritis

    Losing weight can dramatically ease pain and reduce inflammation in patients with osteoarthritis of the knees.
  15. Benefits of music help the heart

    Want a better workout? Turn on some music -- because music can increase the benefits of exercise, according to new research.
  16. Getting fit slashes risk of cancer and heart disease

    A new study finds that keeping fit can dramatically slash your risk for lung and colon cancer as well as heart disease.
  17. Statins don’t improve physical fitness levels

    A new study finds that adding statins to an exercise program provides virtually no improvements in fitness levels and in some cases makes them worse.
  18. A long walking distance can be healthier than running

    A regular walking habit can slash your risk of diabetes and heart disease as well as -- or better than -- running.
  19. Seniors with a fast heartbeat die sooner

    New study finds that seniors with a faster heartbeat in the "healthy zone" die an average four to five years earlier.
  20. The right workout regimen

    Part of getting exercise is getting the right amount -- and sometimes, that means starting out light and working your way up.

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